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An Extinct Animal’s remains discovered

The earth is the only planet in the universe that is known to harbor life, so clearly there are hundreds and thousands of weird things that exist within the parameters of the earth. Researchers, anthropologists, or basically anyone from the field of science have been and still are searching for little pieces of whatever they could find to contribute to their study. You can only imagine their excitement when they came across this majestic creature.

Via: boredomtherapy

Researchers found an enormous 17 feet skeleton protruding from the dirt on a Siberian beach last November 2017. Not long after, they discovered that it was actually the skeleton of an extinct creature.

Via: boredomtherapy
Via: boredomtherapy
Via: boredomtherapy

Russian researcher Marina Shitova discovered the skeleton at Komandorsky Nature Reserve. The skeleton was completely intact, which was unusual for something as huge and as old as what he found.

Via: boredomtherapy
Via: boredomtherapy

The skeleton that was discovered belonged to a Steller’s sea cow. They were named after Georg Steller, the first person to come up with a descriptive image of the sea cows. He discovered them when he accompanied Vitrus Bering on his trip to the North Pacific. Scientifically named Hydrodamalis gigas, they inhabited the Commander Islands located in Russia’s Arctic waters in the Bering Sea.

Via: boredomtherapy
Via: boredomtherapy
Via: boredomtherapy

Not to be confused with Manatees, the Steller’s sea cow was hailed as the largest mammal during its time (compared to manatees that are 3 times smaller.) They were wiped out of existence because people back then hunted these animals for their hides and meat. In addition, adult Steller’s sea cows grew up to 25 to 30 feet in length and would weigh from eight to 10 tons. That’s as heavy as a school bus! But despite their enormous bodies, they can actually swim 8kph up to 15kph. Steller’s sea cows were also known for mourning their fellow sea cows’ death. The observation of their behavior was of course credited to Georg Steller who documented this in his published work, “On the Beasts of the Sea”.

Via: boredomtherapy
Via: boredomtherapy

Just a little fun fact: Steller’s sea cows didn’t have teeth.
This interesting discovery must not be left in the shadows. Share this post with your friends!

Source: boredomtherapy

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