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What made Naoto Matsumura stay living near the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant after the disaster?

After the nuclear disaster of Japan began in 2011 because of a powerful tectonic earthquake, the town of Tomioka, situated near the ruins of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, became an evacuation shelter for nearly affected 300, 000 people up to this day.

Via: sliptalk
Via: sliptalk
Via: sliptalk
Via: sliptalk

However, there is still one brave man who chose to stay and live alone near the hazardous area. Meet the 53-year-old construction worker named Naoto Matsumura. According to him, he wanted to take care of the abandoned animals that needed him.

Via: sliptalk
Via: sliptalk
Via: sliptalk
Via: sliptalk

However, he admitted to escaping the place once before living alone. This is what he said:
“So I did leave once. We headed south as it was safer. My dad suggested that we go to his little sister’s place down south. But she wouldn’t even let us in. She said we were contaminated by radiation. So we went to the evacuee shelters but they were full and turned us away.”

Via: sliptalk
Via: sliptalk

But in a turnout of the event, their supposed plan didn’t work out and he was forced to come back. Now, this is when he realized something.
“It was such a hassle that I decided to come back. That’s when I realized that our animals were still waiting to be fed. I had no choice but to stay. I couldn’t leave the animals behind. They needed to be fed.”

Via: sliptalk
Via: sliptalk

Based on his narration, living alone in a what is considered now as a nowheresville was not a smooth-sailing experience.

Via: sliptalk


“It’s so quiet here. At night it’s dead silent. There are buildings, but no cars or people. It was crazy at first. No lights, no sound. The first week, I was uneasy. It was too quiet.”
However, his great empathy for the animals made him stay. As of now, he was used to it living like this.

Via: sliptalk
Via: sliptalk

“I’m used to it now, but the emotion I felt when I realized I was alone is indescribable. ‘Loneliness’ doesn’t quite capture it. That was the toughest thing to get used to.”
Would you do the same for your animals? Share your thoughts, reactions, and opinions in the comment section below!

Source: sliptalk

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